What is Future of Construction 2014?

Learn exactly why Construction is a great career choice and why it's vital for the growth of the economy and the UK as a whole.

Plus you can be a part of that!

Browse through the bars at the bottom and click on the tag icons     to determine your future in construction.


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Jewson

About Future of Construction

Future of Construction has been created by Jewson with the aim of encouraging young adults interested in pursuing a career in the construction industry.

The sector has a huge part to play in the growth of the economy over the next few decades, with a range of opportunities for skilled tradespeople.

This is why Jewson has set up the Future of Construction Scheme; to help and support young men and women in honing their talent and skills thus providing inspiration for what the future holds.

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Opportunities Environment Challenges Skills

Where are we now?

Construction contributes £90 billion to the UK economy (6.7% of the total) and by 2025, global construction output is forecast to increase from around $8.5 trillion to $12 trillion.
This means that more skilled workers, from design engineers through to carpenters, are needed to compete in the global market.

What will construction be like in 20 years?

In regards to construction output, the Government expects a 6% annual rate of growth until 2021.
The sustainable building industry itself is expected to grow at an annual rate of 22.8% until 2017.
This anticipated rapid growth shows the wealth of opportunities there is to be had in the construction industry.

Vast Career Opportunities

There are between 1.7 and 2.5 million new homes to be built by 2025, meaning that thousands of skilled workers are needed to keep up with demand for houses as the country grows.
To ensure this growth, work is also needed on Crossrail, which serves as Europe’s largest infrastructure project that will employ 14,000 people at its peak, up until 2015.
It is also estimated that there is to be a $200 billion per annum global market for integrated city systems by 2030, with profound implications for UK construction.

Job Satisfaction

The construction industry has the highest rates of job satisfaction, stability and career advancement, making it a great career choice.
With the rapid rate of growth expected, the number and variety of jobs available will be extensive.

How Green is the UK?

More than 140 wind farms were given the go-ahead in 2013, which means that granted planning permission has risen by two thirds since 2010. More than 5% of Britain’s energy is now generated from wind farms.
Other countries including Australia, Singapore, Germany and South Africa are also planning for long term green industry success.

What about Scotland's Environment?

Scotland has pledged to decarbonise the power sector by 2030, which means that new offshore wind farms need to be built to supplement the pledge.
The UK sources just 10% of its total power from wind farms, both onshore and offshore, although since 2011 the number of planned wind farms has doubled which is impressive.
Currently, both Scotland and England are aiming to meet a 2020 goal of reducing emissions by 42% against a 1990 baseline.

How is the Government Supporting the Environment?

The Government is currently investing £110 million per year until 2017 in an effort to restore the conditions of rivers, lakes and their wildlife.
The restoration process is set to be worth more than £600 million and will look to create thousands of jobs in the environment sector.

Will there be more jobs created from Green Initiatives?

From spring this year, households will be able to apply for the Renewable Heat Incentive Scheme (RHI), which will provide financial support for those wishing to use renewable energy to heat their homes.
This includes solar thermal systems, heat pumps and biomass technology.
The scheme is set to create a substantial amount of jobs according to Parliament.

Are there any Challenges facing the Construction Industry?

The Government is focused on growing the construction industry to ensure the UK hits its long term environmental targets.
Additionally, there needs to be support ready to help young people gain the necessary skills to support an ageing workforce.

What are the Biggest Challenges?

The global population, according to the United Nations, is set to increase to around 9 billion people over the next 40 years.
This means dramatic shifts across the world will present substantial infrastructure challenges so the UK must take into account its economic capability within the next few years to meet these global needs.

Knowledge and Expertise - How can it be Sustained?

Learning opportunities within the industry are often team based, meaning that when a project ends, the knowledge is largely lost.
More focus needs to be invested into individual learning, with higher priority placed on new workers retaining the knowledge learnt in training and apprenticeships.

How will the UK lower its Carbon Footprint?

The UK needs to meet the 80% carbon reduction target by 2050, therefore there is a pressing need to ensure the UK’s new and existing building stock is fit for a low carbon economy.
The industry needs a capable workforce that can deliver the required changes of the next decade, and firms must be able to recruit, train and retain people to ensure that the UK meets its environmental targets.

What Skills are needed to get into Construction

Some qualifications are needed for specific roles and any work experience you do will help you get a step on the ladder. It's not just about the university degree. Opportunities like college studies, apprenticeships and professional qualifications are all relevant.

Is Higher Education necessary?

Though a degree is not always necessary for a role in construction, more focus is being put into getting people onto relevant courses at Universities throughout the UK.
The Government plans to work with the higher education sector to explore the benefits of degree level qualifications within construction.

How will the Government grow the Construction Industry?

Due to the predicted increase of 2.74 million new job openings within engineering between 2010 and 2020, there needs to be a higher number of school children choosing engineering subjects to fill these positions.
The Government is currently working with children as young as eleven to get them interested in construction.

What Schemes are Available to get into the Industry?

There are currently no less than seven existing schemes to get young people into construction including Open Doors, STEMNET and CITB; all of which provide help and understanding towards the rewards of working in the construction industry.
According to CITB, 19% of the current UK workforce will reach retirement age within the next ten years. This means that over 400,000 new skilled workers will be required.

What is Future of Construction 2014

Learn exactly why Construction is a great career choice and why it's vital for the growth of the economy and the UK as a whole.
Click the button and scroll down to learn more.

Explore

Jewson

About Future of Construction

Future of Construction is a scheme initiated by Jewson that aims to get young adults and children interested in the construction industry.
Jewson knows that the construction industry has a huge part to play in the growth of the economy over the next decade, and that it is important to start nurturing the next generation of skilled workers ready for the future.
This is why Jewson has set up the Future of Construction scheme, to help and support young men and women to realise, craft and professionalise their talent and skills.
Offering a variety of advice, free materials, competitions and cash accounts, the scheme works closely with secondary schools and colleges to help young people understand their options after leaving full time education.

Contact

  • Opportunities
  • Environment
  • Challenges
  • Skills

    Opportunities

  • There are between 1.7 and 2.5 million new homes to be built by 2025, meaning that thousands of skilled workers are needed to keep up with demand for houses as the country grows.
    To ensure this growth, work is also needed on Crossrail, which serves as Europe’s largest infrastructure project that will employ 14,000 people at its peak, up until 2015.
    It is also estimated that there is to be a $200 billion per annum global market for integrated city systems by 2030, with profound implications for UK construction.
  • The construction industry has the highest rates of job satisfaction, stability and career advancement, making it a great career choice.
    With the rapid rate of growth expected, the number and variety of jobs available will be extensive.
  • In regards to construction output, the Government expects a 6% annual rate of growth until 2021.
    The sustainable building industry itself is expected to grow at an annual rate of 22.8% until 2017.
    This anticipated rapid growth shows the wealth of opportunities there is to be had in the construction industry.
  • Construction contributes £90 billion to the UK economy (6.7% of the total) and by 2025, global construction output is forecast to increase from around $8.5 trillion to $12 trillion.
    This means that more skilled workers, from design engineers through to carpenters, are needed to compete in the global market.

    Environment

  • More than 140 wind farms were given the go-ahead in 2013, which means that granted planning permission has risen by two thirds since 2010. More than 5% of Britain’s energy is now generated from wind farms.
    Other countries including Australia, Singapore, Germany and South Africa are also planning for long term green industry success.
  • The Government is currently investing £110 million per year until 2017 in an effort to restore the conditions of rivers, lakes and their wildlife.
    The restoration process is set to be worth more than £600 million and will look to create thousands of jobs in the environment sector.
  • Scotland has pledged to decarbonise the power sector by 2030, which means that new offshore wind farms need to be built to supplement the pledge.
    The UK sources just 10% of its total power from wind farms, both onshore and offshore, although since 2011 the number of planned wind farms has doubled which is impressive.
    Currently, both Scotland and England are aiming to meet a 2020 goal of reducing emissions by 42% against a 1990 baseline.
  • From spring this year, households will be able to apply for the Renewable Heat Incentive Scheme (RHI), which will provide financial support for those wishing to use renewable energy to heat their homes.
    This includes solar thermal systems, heat pumps and biomass technology.
    The scheme is set to create a substantial amount of jobs according to Parliament.

Challenges

  • The Government is focused on growing the construction industry to ensure the UK hits its long term environmental targets.
    Additionally, there needs to be support ready to help young people gain the necessary skills to support an ageing workforce.
  • The global population, according to the United Nations, is set to increase to around 9 billion people over the next 40 years.
    This means dramatic shifts across the world will present substantial infrastructure challenges so the UK must take into account its economic capability within the next few years to meet these global needs.
  • Learning opportunities within the industry are often team based, meaning that when a project ends, the knowledge is largely lost.
    More focus needs to be invested into individual learning, with higher priority placed on new workers retaining the knowledge learnt in training and apprenticeships.
  • The UK needs to meet the 80% carbon reduction target by 2050, therefore there is a pressing need to ensure the UK’s new and existing building stock is fit for a low carbon economy.
    The industry needs a capable workforce that can deliver the required changes of the next decade, and firms must be able to recruit, train and retain people to ensure that the UK meets its environmental targets.

    Skills

  • Some qualifications are needed for specific roles and any work experience you do will help you get a step on the ladder. It's not just about the university degree. Opportunities like college studies, apprenticeships and professional qualifications are all relevant.
  • Though a degree is not always necessary for a role in construction, more focus is being put into getting people onto relevant courses at Universities throughout the UK.
    The Government plans to work with the higher education sector to explore the benefits of degree level qualifications within construction.
  • Due to the predicted increase of 2.74 million new job openings within engineering between 2010 and 2020, there needs to be a higher number of school children choosing engineering subjects to fill these positions.
    The Government is currently working with children as young as eleven to get them interested in construction.
  • There are currently no less than seven existing schemes to get young people into construction including Open Doors, STEMNET and CITB; all of which provide help and understanding towards the rewards of working in the construction industry.
    According to CITB, 19% of the current UK workforce will reach retirement age within the next ten years. This means that over 400,000 new skilled workers will be required.


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